Volume No. 11 Issue No.: 4 Page No.: 760-764 April-June 2017

 

ASSESSMENT OF FLOOD HAZARD AREAS WITH PREDICTIVE MAPPING AND INUNDATION AREA FORECASTING FOR EACH METER RISE IN THE WATER LEVEL OF RIVER YAMUNA IN DELHI, INDIA

 

Bose Parmita*1 and Arora Vishal2

1. Geo Spatial Delhi Limited (GSDL), A NCT of Delhi Government Company, Civil Lines, New Delhi (INDIA)
2. Deapartment of Urban planning and Management, University of Manitoba (CANADA)

 

Received on : October 12, 2016

 

ABSTRACT

 

Flood is a big threat to urbanization. Due to the lack of proper management and planning, in the period of heavy rainfall, cities sometimes experience flood scenario. Therefore, it is very important to assess the vulnerable areas of the city to avoid settlements in those areas. Further, preventive measures and mitigation strategies should be adopted so that the losses can be minimized in the event of a catastrophe. To assess these kindsofvulnerable areas in a city, predictive mapping technique is very useful.Yamuna River flows through the eastern part of the national capital territory of Delhi which is a fast growing city with fast emerging settlements. Presently the settlements areexpandedupto that extent of the river, thatcomes under the flood plain.In recent days, the scanty of water has made the river bed narrow. But during the rainy season the river poses another scenario. During the monsoons, the river surgesand covers a large stretch of the area that inundates both sides of the river banks. Yamuna crossed its danger level (fixed at 204.83m at Delhi) twenty five times during the last 33 years. The current paper attempts to predict the inundated area during flood,with each meter rise in the water level. The results show that if the water level of river Yamuna rises merely 3 meters i.e. from 203 meter to 206 meter, a vast area along the banks would be submerged into floodwater. The study also indicates the vulnerable areas along the river banks.

 

Keywords : Digital elevation model(DEM), water level,inundated area, vulnerable areas

 

 

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